It couldn’t have been a shark

Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Google+
https://darknessprevails.org/it-couldnt-have-been-a-shark/

This happened last summer while I was on a diving trip with other certified divers my age.

This was fun, since we were all teenagers who needed something to do or something to get away from during the summer. We were all staying on a catamaran in the waters surrounding the Caribbean island of Saba.

Saba is known for its great efforts to prevent pollution of both their island and the marine park surrounding it. It was our second night there, and we were all excited to hear that we could go on a night dive.

Night dives are always creepy, because you can’t see much through the dark waters, except what your flashlight is shining on.

Of course, what else would you expect? We had our dinner around nine in the evening, and began to get ready.

We put our gear together and Brought it to the back of the boat, where we would take our big strides in. Our dive master was talking to the skipper, who seemed a little unsure. Off of what we could gather from the conversation, the skipper was positive that we should be situated near a broad stretch of coral reef, however, based off of what the Dive master said, there was nothing but sand.

This stuck me as odd, in the sense that they have been doing this specific route for a long time, but I brushed it off.

Once everyone was ready, we all attached glow sticks of matching colors to our tanks, and to our dive buddy’s. For those of you who don’t scuba dive, divers use a buddy system to make sure no one gets lost, or gets into a bad situation like running low on air without assistance.

I was with a kid who I’ll call K. We got along pretty well, and both of us liked to swim a good 8 feet out from the rest of the group. It was a pretty stupid thing to do, but we figured that as long as we could see the group, we would be fine.

So of course, once we had gotten down to the sea floor, which was around 55-60 feet, we spread out.

It was abnormally cold for being in the Caribbean, even if it was night and we were deep down. K and I were a good 5 feet apart from each other, but we would routinely signal each other to make sure we were ok.

I spent the first five minutes of the dive leisurely looking around, which gave me a little perspective.

If you were to look up, you would see a small patch of light from the moon, and that was about it. Eventually, K and I started to swim closer to each other, as we had begun to lag behind, we were around 15 feet behind the group, when I noticed something drifting along the bottom.

I shone my light on it to see parts of dead sea animals. I got curious as I usually am, and swam past it a little. I honestly was hoping to see a shark or something of the sorts, but instead I found a big pit in the ground.

It was in no way natural, and it was obvious something had dug it.

My initial thought was something along the lines of “Oh it must be one of those fish that digs nests to attract a mate,” but it was way to big for that to be feasible.

It looked like a sizable shark could easily fit in it. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the worst part. The pit was filled with varying sizes of bones and other dead things. I didn’t know what to think, so I did a sharp 180 and swam back as fast as I could. I made it back to the group and we kept going.

Not five minutes later, a very weird noise rang out through the water.

It sounded similar to a whale call, but it had this lower growl under the screech. I turned to my buddy and based off of what his expression told me, he hadn’t heard it. I started to get a little freaked out, but I kept my breathing under check to make sure I didn’t lose oxygen.

Once again, I brushed it off and kept swimming. Maybe fifteen minutes later our group found a baby flounder, we all took turns looking at it, and watching it jerkily swim around.

I stayed a bit longer. K stayed a good halfway in between me and the group, to make sure I could find my way back. I don’t know what lead me to turn around towards the pit, but I did, and my flashlight cut through the darkness.

If there’s anything I regret, it was that.

In the distance, I saw what I originally mistook as a large fish. It was spiny, not to mention unnaturally pale, and it had these long limbs. It looked so unnatural, that I couldn’t take my eyes away from it.

It started to swim towards me, and thats when I realized it didn’t have a tail or any sort of appendage which could aid this thing in swimming. It wasn’t a fish. It clawed its way painfully through the water with these long thin arms, which seemed to bend the wrong way every time.

I was perplexed, and kept watching this thing. From what I could gather, it looked as if you took the bones of some large creature, and stretched waterlogged human skin over it.

It was ugly.

The thing stared at me with these horrendous silver eyes, and what I could only assume was its mouth seemed to bubble. This thing then let out a loud scream, almost the same as the one I had heard earlier. I think that was what tore my eyes away from it. I slowly started to swim backwards, before I decided “Screw it” and booked it out of there.

I made it back to the group, and we soon ascended to the surface.

I was a bit shaken up, but I calmed down out of the water. I ended up asking the Dive master about it, or at least trying.

She asked me if what I saw had big eyes that lit up when you shined a light at them.

I answered yes, thinking I was getting somewhere, but then she brushed it off as a tuna fish. I know what tuna look like, and there was no way that was a tuna. Needless to say I didn’t sleep too much that night, or all nights for the rest of the time we were in the waters near Saba.

So if you go night diving around a sandy area off the coasts of Saba, be aware of what all might be living out there, under the radar.

Comments

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
Notify of