I Saw Him Too

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https://darknessprevails.org/i-saw-him-too-2/

Perhaps I should start by revealing my location, sex, and age. I am a female, nineteen years of age, though at the time I was seventeen, and I live in Texas. When this incident occurred, I was living in a small town by the name of Cleveland Texas.

Trails End was the name of the estate– It was a trailer park, buried within woods. It was a place easily overlooked. I’m not quite sure how my mother’s, I have two, found it.

Cleveland is an approximate hour and a half from Houston. Well, with my mother’s erratic driving. They are both EMT’s, so they often took forty-eight hour shifts. This left myself, my sister, and my brother at home alone with two dogs.

A Pitbull and a Doberman Pinscher. I know this may be a little too much information, but this all pertains to the incident. My siblings and I had a chore of taking the dogs out every night before we slipped into bed.

I am deathly afraid of werewolves, so heading out at nighttime was something I never desired to do. Out of fear, I told my fifteen year old, petite, 4’11”, sister and my twelve year old, 4’6″, brother to take them out.

Myself being 5’3″, athletic build, and simply more capable of holding onto a Doberman’s leash better than the both of them, and this was no typical Doberman Pinscher. She was a European Warlock, bred to take down boar and bear. Her back reached about 4’2″ and her weight was 160lbs.

Her canines were an approximate two inches long. She was a massive dog. She was capable of taking down anything, as we had seen before. She took down a buck by merely charging him, using her bind legs to force her high enough to reach his neck, and pulled him down.

It was silly trying to explain to the Game Warden that we did not unleash her to do so. In fact, this is why we had to walk her. We couldn’t risk her being put down. A $3,000 plus $2,500 on successfully curing her of Parvo would’ve upset my mother if the money had gone to waste.

I know. If you wanted to read numbers, you would’ve picked a math book.

Trust me, these numbers are seemingly vital to this horrific tale.

Not even five minutes after I sent them outside, both of the dogs had pried themselves from my siblings’ hands. The two of them came into the house, crying.

They were apologizing profusely, and I annoyed, hushed them and asked them to accompany me in finding the dogs. Their response was, “of course,” for none of us wished to get into trouble with our parents.

We readied ourselves with extra leashes, flashlights, and our bikes. Well, their bicycles. I didn’t have one. My had been run over one evening, so I had my feet. It wasn’t an issue for me. And so we began our trek through the silent roads of our neighborhood. They explained that the dogs had run off into the woods. This was believable, considering that is the only place they’d flee to.

The two of them parted ways from me. They would check the streets while I walked through the woods. I warily agreed. I wasn’t fond of the idea, given the only thing popping up in my head was a werewolf, but I obliged. Confronting my fears was nothing to a month worth of grounding. So, armed with a mere flashlight and my feet, I walked.

There were fresh dog tracks.

They were large like my Doberman, but I was so afraid of spotting a werewolf, I disregarded logic. However, I pressed forward. As I traveled deeper into the woods, the more I relaxed. Despite the occasional shuffle of leaves in front of me, everything seemed calm. The disturbance of leaves could have only been one or both of our dogs, so I worried not.

The pattern of feet sounded as though it was an animal on all fours. This eased my mind, considering a werewolf would’ve walked on two legs. Then– The pattern stopped. I called out for Storm, my Doberman, and heard a shuffle of leaves as the animal ran away from me.

“Godda– Storm!”

I began running now. I had no idea how far I was into the forest at this point.

Frankly, I didn’t care either. That was until I stumbled upon a shack. It was disheveled, run down. The single window by the door had been shattered; the wood rotting, snapped, and scraped away.

Though it seems an ignorant idea, I switched off my flashlight. If there was anyone inside, I did not wish to draw their attention to me.

Hypocritical, I suppose, considering the next part. I don’t know what compelled me to do so, but I reached for the knob. I twisted it and heard a click confirming that it was unlocked.

I entered, cautiously, and found newspapers scattered about. They ranged between the years 1962 and 2013.

Cocking my head I reached for one of the papers. It listed comics, missing persons, and available occupations.

“Hm.”

Then, it happened. There were footsteps drawing near the shack. They weren’t an animal’s. They came in two’s, heavy. It was as if they wanted to be heard.
I dropped the paper immediately.

I could feel my knees begin to buckle in fear.

“Faith?”

I sighed in relief. It was my little brother. They addressed me by my middle name.

“Are you there?”

My sister’s voice chimed in. I wanted to speak out, but something seemed off. I couldn’t tell if it was my paranoia or if something was actually wrong.

“Faith, did you find Stormy?”

I felt a wash of relief once more. It was my brother. He always addressed Storm by her, though short, elongated name.

“No,” I finally answered, “though I think she’s stalking around somewhere out here.”

“Come out here. Let’s look for her together.” Alexis started again. However, there was an eerie neutrality to her voice. She didn’t sound human. It could’ve been due to the cold, but I didn’t trust it.

“J-Just a moment–” I leaned up cautiously and peered out through the window. There was a singular silhouette, much too tall to be my sister, and way too tall to be my brother. Hell– It couldn’t have even been one of my mothers.

“Maria.”

His voice was deeper now. It was definitely not my brother. Even if he chose to hit puberty in that instance, he would have never called me by my first name.

“You had better get out of there.”

I winced at his tone.

“Now.” He warned.

I couldn’t tell if he was a grown man. He seemed much too tall to even be considered human. I froze, and just as I was about to flip on my flashlight, I heard a faint rustle of movement to my left. Well, we heard it.

I could tell because he turned his head towards the noise. It was definitely no werewolf, given its ovaloid face, spiraled horns, and beard. I gasped silencing myself with my hands.

A guttural growl erupted from the left. It sounded like Storm. The beast outside of the shack stiffened. He turned towards the canine, digitrade hind legs shifting with his steps.

What erupted from his muzzle brought tears to my eyes. He shook his head, tilted his head back, and screamed. It sounded like a terrified woman and a fox. It was a shriek, shrill. The canine began barking.

“Storm!”

I called out. He worked his head up, his ears raising in curiosity. It was a terrible idea at the time, but worked wonders with my luck. She had charged him. I could hear her heavy steps. I twisted the knob and bolted outside. I turned back for a split second to see her up on her hind legs. She was attempting his neck to no avail. He was much too massive.

You see, when she stands up, she’s about 6’2″. Judging by the fact that she didn’t reach his neck, he had to have been 7’5″ or 8’0″ tall.

I heard her whine, and my heart ached. She had gotten hurt, and I was next. I could hear his steps drawing near.

The noise was too close for comfort, and no matter the amount of adrenaline pumping through my veins, I couldn’t outrun him. He screamed. It was so startling that, as cliche as it sounds, I stumbled. I laughed at myself in my head, for I never imagined that I’d be so close to being home free without ever reaching it.

It seemed to happen slowly. It was agonizingly slow… As I tried to stand, I felt a sharp blow at my side. His horns had struck my ribs knocking the wind out of me, and as I tried to catch my breath he began pacing towards me.

I could hear him sniffing the air.

“Come now, Maria,” he paused momentarily, “don’t be afraid.”

I refused to look towards him. His silhouette was terrifying enough. If I had seen his features, I would be doomed to trauma.
He just wouldn’t have it. He reached his hand out towards me, two hoofed fingers and a thumb, gripped my chin, and turned me to him.
There was a flash of light, and I saw his features. Jagged yellow teeth, sideways slit pupils, matted white fur, human male torso, red eyes, and a grin like no other was all exposed to me before he disappeared.

“Faith!”

My sister called to me.

“Faith, are you okay?”

My brother followed her.

I could feel their hands trying to pull me up, but I swatted them away. I didn’t know if it was really them or more of the beast.

“D-Did you see…”

They hushed me.

“It’s okay. We found Zeus. Is Storm with you?”

Alexis questioned. I shook my head, and just as I was about to explain my concern for her wellbeing, Storm trotted towards us. She had damage to her nose and chest.
I didn’t realize the pain in my side until we had made it home. I was on edge, worried, cautious the whole quest back. I locked all of the doors, told my brother to head to bed, and nailed a blanket over my sister and I’s window.
I turned on the Television and raised the volume as much as possible as not to disturb the neighbors or anger our parents when they got home.

“Faith…”

My sister sighed.

“I know your scared, but this isn’t necessary.”

I shook my head. “You don’t know what I went through. Alexis…” I began to tear up. “You didn’t see what I saw.”

She explained that I should lower my voice as to not scare my brother, Christian.

Then, she whispered out something I’d never forget.

“I saw him too.”

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