Tag: diving

Silent Cove

This is an entry about a trip I took in February this year, I would not write about a minor trip and can tell you my experiences were nothing less than completely bizarre.

Are mother is single and usually can not afford to take us on expensive vacations frequently. She is hardworking but wanted to find something that comfortable but not to costly. It took about an hour of browsing through TripAdvisor before she found something that fit our needs. Me and my brother were relatively low maintenance and were just happy to be going anywhere, are mother was very excited, much more than usual!


Phantom in the Wreck

Allow me to give you some background on what I do and the region I am from. I work as a public safety diver for the local sheriff department. I recover anything and everything that goes into the water from airplanes and buses, to stolen firearms, jewelry, and cars to bodies of both people and pets. Outside of that job, I am an avid technical wreck diver. Us technical divers go far deeper than the average scuba diver. We have intense training, dive exotic gases (helium), and we run a much higher risk of something going catastrophically wrong. We cannot surface from 200ft as death and or something more debilitating will happen once we reach it. That means we are on our down there and carry everything we need on a single dive. We accept these risks as the deeper you go, the more pristine and intact the wreck becomes. There is no other feeling than being the first person to lay eyes on ship that has not been seen since she sank, and now you become part of her story.

The Great Lakes offers the best shipwreck diving anywhere in the world. The cold fresh waters preserves shipwrecks from the late 1600s all the way to to modern times. From wooden sailing ships that still look like they can sail away on the bottom, to massive steel freighters that you can’t believe were overwhelmed and sunk by a furious lake. The Great Lakes also has the highest concentration of shipwrecks per square mile than anywhere else in the world with an estimated 10,000 wrecks. That’s more than tenfold of what the legendary Bermuda Triangle holds and at less than 12th of the size. Lake Superior is the largest of the five lakes and also holds the title for deepest, coldest, and most isolated of all the others along with the fewest divable shipwrecks. The cold black waters holds many of her secrets and dead crewman as it is too cold for natural processes to bring them back up.¬†As you can imagine many of these wrecks still hold their crew inside the hulls on eternal watch.